Virtual Cinema

By purchasing a ticket to watch at home one of the films in our virtual cinema, you’ll be supporting CineCina just as if you were attending a screening at our festival. Thank you for your continued support!

Raining in the Mountain
(2K Restoration)

Directed by King Hu

Taiwan, Hong Kong | 1979 | 120 minutes |
Mandarin with English subtitles
US Premiere in CineCina Film Festival 2019
During the Ming Dynasty, a Buddhist abbot charged with protecting the sacred scroll of Tripitaka prepares to name his successor. An aristocrat and a general arrive at his secluded mountaintop monastery promising to help in his search, but are in fact scheming to secure the scroll for themselves. As they set about recommending corrupt successors, rival bands of martial artists lie in wait to steal the precious artifact. Soon, the monastery is transformed into an epic battleground for the scroll, with each player caught in a web of betrayal. 

The Fate of Lee Khan
(2K Restoration)

Directed by King Hu

Taiwan, Hong Kong | 1973 | 106 minutes |
Mandarin with English subtitles
In his follow-up to the critically-acclaimed A TOUCH OF ZEN, trailblazing Chinese filmmaker King Hu brings together an all-star female cast, including Hong Kong cinema stalwart Li Li-hua and Angela “Lady Whirlwind” Mao, in this lively martial arts adventure. When Lee Khan, an official working for Mongolian Emperor Yuan of the Yuan Dynasty procures the battle map of the Chinese rebel army, Chinese resistance fighters, aided by an undercover girl-gang within Khan’s ranks, strive to corner him in an inn. 

All About Lily Chou-Chou

Directed by Shunji Iwai
Japan | 2001 | 146 minutes |
Japanese with English subtitles
For kids around the world, music is often the only salvation when the pain and anxiety of teenage life becomes too much to bear. Yuichi (Hayato Ichihara) is in the 8th grade and he worships Lily Chou-Chou, a Bjork-like chanteuse whose epic music is lush and transcendent. Yuichi only lives for Lily Chou-Chou’s big Tokyo concert, where the lies and violence can be washed away by the presence of his goddess and her powerful music. But fate has yet another obstacle in store for Lily’s devoted fan.

Woman on the Beach
(New 4K Restoration)

Directed by Hong Sang-soo
South Korea | 2006 | 127 minutes |
Korean with English subtitles
Filmmaker Joong-rae, suffering from writer’s block, takes a trip to the coast with his production designer Chang-wook, who brings along the vivacious Moon-sook. Soon after their arrival, Moon-sook falls for Joong-rae’s advances; however, the fickle hero can’t commit and he awkwardly parts with her. What had been a sardonic Jules and Jim turns into a burlesque Vertigo when Joong-rae returns to the coastal resort and attempts to recreate the original romance with a woman who resembles Moon-sook, until his jilted lover shows up…

Hill of Freedom

Directed by Hong Sang-soo
South Korea | 2014 | 67 minutes |
Korean with English subtitles
Kwon (Seo Young-hwa) returns to Seoul from a restorative stay in the mountains. She is given a packet of letters left by Mori (Ryo Kase, Like Someone In Love), who has come back from Japan to propose to her. As she walks down a flight of stairs, Kwon drops and scatters the letters, all of which are undated. When she reads them, she has to make sense of the chronology… and so must we. Shot in the narrow alleys, petite cafes and beautiful hanok inns of Seoul’s historic Jong-ro district, a favorite Hong location, Hill of Freedom is a masterful, alternately funny and haunting, tale of love and longing from the great director.

Shanghai Triad

Directed by Yimou Zhang
France, China | 1995 | 108 minutes |
Mandarin with English subtitles
Hired to be a servant to pampered nightclub singer and mob moll Xiao Jinbao (Gong Li, Ju Dou, Farewell My Concubine), naive teenager Shuisheng (Wang Xiaoxiao) is thrust into the glamorous and deadly demimonde of Shanghai’s crime syndicates. Over the course of seven days, Shuisheng observes mounting tensions as triad boss Tang begins to suspect traitors amongst his ranks and rivals for Xiao Jinbao’s affections.

 

Creepy

Directed by KIYOSHI KUROSAWA
Japan | 2016 | 130 minutes | Japanese with English subtitles

Kiyoshi Kurosawa, who made his name with classics Cure and Bright Future, gets back to his roots by putting the thumbscrews to the audience with his latest, Creepy. A year after a botched hostage negotiation with a serial killer turned deadly, ex-detective Koichi (Hidetoshi Nishijima), and his wife move into a new house with a deeply strange new neighbor (Teruyuki Kagawa). His old cop colleagues come calling for his help on a mysterious case, which may be related to the strange goings-on next door, in this insidiously-constructed narrative that braids plot twists on top of plot twists and shock on top of shock.

Influenza

Directed by Bong Joon-ho
South Korea | 2004 | 30 minutes |
Korean with English subtitles
INFLUENZA is a startling short film that marks a singular achievement in the filmmaker’s thrilling body of work. Such an impression is clear from the very first image — a security-camera perspective through which he’ll orchestrate his characteristic tensions, twists, and brutal acts of violence — and grows stronger the deeper we wade into his nightmare vision. Bong’s typical instances of levity are few and far between, and an extreme austerity only heightens the mystery, the shock of what unfolds. By film’s end you’ll be asking yourself, more than with any of his works, “What did I even see?”

 

Caniba

Directed by Véréna Paravel, Lucien Castaing-Taylor
France | 2017 | 97 minutes | Japanese, French, English
As a 32-year-old student at the Sorbonne in Paris, Issei Sagawa was arrested on June 13, 1981 when spotted emptying two bloody suitcases containing the remains of his Dutch classmate, Renée Hartevelt. Two days earlier, Mr. Sagawa had killed Hartevelt and began eating her. Declared legally insane, he returned to Japan. He has been a free man ever since. Ostracized from society, he has made his living off his crime by writing novels, drawing manga, appearing in innumerable documentaries and sexploitation films in which he reenacts his crime, and even becoming a food critic. 

 

Violent Cop

Directed by Takeshi Kitano
Japan | 1989 | 103 minutes | Japanese with English subtitles
In his explosive directorial debut Japanese renaissance man-cum-comedian-extraordinaire Takeshi “Beat” Kitano plays vicious rogue homicide Detective Azuma who takes on a sadistic crime syndicate only to discover widespread internal corruption in the police force. Facing criminal charges for his unorthodox “Dirty Harry” type methods, Azuma finds himself caught in a web of betrayal and intrigue that sends him on a bloody trail of vengeance. But when his sister is kidnapped by a sadistic drug lord, Azuma’s tactics escalate towards an apocalyptic climax.

Boiling Point

Directed by Takeshi Kitano
Japan | 1990 | 97 minutes | Japanese with English subtitles
In enfant terrible Takeshi Kitano’s explosive second feature film, Masaki (Yûrei Yanagi) is an unassuming gas station attendant and amateur baseball player for underdog team The Eagles. After he enrages a local yakuza, setting off a feud between the gangsters and his coach, Masaki heads to Okinawa on a haphazard quest for guns with his friend Kazuo (Dancan). There they are befriended by the uber-eccentric yakuza boss Uehara (played by Kitano), who initiates them into the strange and brutal world of organized crime.

 

Outrage Coda

Directed by Takeshi Kitano
Japan | 2017 | 104 minutes | Japanese with English subtitles
Five years after surviving the all-out war between the Sanno and Hanabishi crime families, former yakuza boss Otomo now works in South Korea for Mr. Chang, a renowned fixer whose influence extends into Japan. A relatively minor incident causes tensions to rise between Chang Enterprises and the faraway powerful Hanabishi. The growing conflict gets out of hand and ignites a ferocious power struggle among the top echelons of the Hanabishi. When eventually Chang’s life is endangered, devoted yakuza Otomo returns to Japan to settle things once and for all.

THE WILD GOOSE LAKE

Directed by Diao Yinan
China, France | 2019 | 110 minutes |
Chinese with English Subtitles
When small-time mob leader Zhou Zenong (Chinese superstar Hu Ge) accidentally kills a cop, a dead-or-alive bounty is placed on his head, forcing him on the lam from both the police as well as dangerous gangsters out for the reward. Hiding out in China’s densely populated (and deeply divided) Wuhan province, Zhou becomes entangled with a beautiful, enigmatic woman, who has mysterious intentions of her own. 

Read our interview with the director here.

Hana-bi (Fireworks)

Directed by Takeshi Kitano
Japan | 1997 | 103 minutes | Japanese with English Subtitles
Feeling responsible for the shattered lives of his loved ones, beleaguered police detective Nishi (Takeshi Kitano) takes desperate measures to try and set things right in a world gone wrong. With his wife suffering from leukemia and his partner paralyzed from a brutal gangster attack, Nishi borrows money from a yakuza loan shark and then robs a bank to clear his debt. The yakuza, however, are not so easily bought off, sending Nishi down a road paved with nihilism and violence. 

Still Life

Directed by Jia Zhang Ke
China, Hong Kong | 2006 | 108 minutes |
Chinese with English Subtitles
In Still Life, great changes have come to the town of Fengjie due to the construction of the Three Gorges hydro project: Countless families that had lived there for many generations have had to relocate to other cities. Fengjie’s old town, which has a 2000-year history, has been torn down and submerged forever, but its new neighborhood hasn’t been finished yet. There are still things that need to be salvaged and yet there are also things that must be left behind. 

The Hole

Directed by Tsai Ming-Liang
Taiwan | 1998 | 89 minutes | Mandarin with English subtitles
Set just prior to the start of the 21st century, this vaguely futuristic story follows two residents of a quickly crumbling building who refuse to leave their homes in spite of a virus that has forced the evacuation of the area. As rain pours down relentlessly, a single man is stuck with an unfinished plumbing job and a hole in his floor. This results in a very odd relationship with the woman who lives below him. Combining deadpan humor with an austere view of loneliness and a couple of unexpected musical numbers, Tsai Ming-Liang crafted one of the most original films of the 1990s.

Rebels of the Neon God (New Restoration)

Directed by Tsai Ming-Liang
Taiwan | 1992 | 106 minutes | Mandarin with English subtitles
The loosely structured plot involves Hsiao-kang, a despondent cram school student, who becomes obsessed with young petty thief Ah-tze, after Ah-tze smashes the rearview mirror of a taxi driven by Hsiao-kang’s father. Hsiao-kang stalks Ah-tze and his buddy Ah-ping as they hang out in the film’s iconic arcade (featuring a telling poster of James Dean on the wall) and other locales around Taipei, and ultimately takes his revenge. 

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